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smiling-male-doctor-with-his-flu-shot.jpg
Thankfully, there’s a simple, free, or low-cost way to protect yourself from flu this fall and winter. Protect yourself and your loved ones from flu by getting a flu shot.
FLU FACTS
52,000
In a bad flu season, as many as 52,000 people have died from flu.
82%
A flu shot can reduce the risk of ICU admission by up to 82%.
35%
Last season, people who got vaccinated were 35% less likely to get the flu.
Get Answers
Whether you've had a flu shot before or not, you might have questions about it.

We have the answers to your questions.
Can a flu shot give you the flu?
Flu shots cannot give you the flu, although some people may have mild side effects. Getting flu is usually much worse than the side effects a flu shot can cause.
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How often should you get a flu shot?
CDC recommends getting a flu shot every year because protection from the shot declines over time. Flu viruses are also constantly changing, so flu shots are updated each year to provide the best protection.
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When should I get a flu shot?
Flu season often starts in October and gets worse through the winter. It’s good to get a flu vaccine before the end of October. It takes about 2 weeks for protection from vaccination to start. Getting a flu vaccine at any time during flu season is better than not getting one at all.
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Who should get a flu shot?
CDC and other health experts recommend that everyone age 6 months and older get vaccinated against flu each year, with rare exception. Vaccination is particularly important for some groups who are more likely to get seriously ill with the flu. This includes pregnant people, young children, older adults and people with certain chronic medical conditions. People who have concerns about allergies should discuss a flu vaccine with their health care professional.
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Are there side effects from a flu shot?
Flu vaccines can cause side effects for some people. Most of the time these are mild and go away on their own in a short time. These can include: soreness or redness where the shot was given, a headache, muscle aches, and fatigue.
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Are flu shots effective?
Yes, CDC studies show that a flu shot usually reduces the risk of getting sick with flu by between 40% and 60%. If you get a flu shot and do get sick with flu, being vaccinated can help make your illness less severe.
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I have home remedies that treat the flu. Why should I get the shot?
While flu antivirals are the only drugs that are approved to treat flu illness, there many ways that people address flu symptoms if you do get sick. But it's better to avoid getting sick in the first place!

Getting a flu shot is the best way to avoid getting sick.
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How do we know flu shots are safe?
Flu shots are closely monitored by the FDA and CDC each year to ensure they are safe for the public.

Flu vaccines have a strong safety record. Hundreds of millions of Americans have safely received flu vaccines for more than 50 years, and there has been extensive research supporting the safety of flu vaccines.
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Get My Shot
Most insurance plans cover flu vaccines at no cost to you. You can get vaccinated at your doctor’s office or find locations to get a flu shot at most pharmacies, county health departments and urgent care centers. If you don’t have insurance, you can still get a free or low-cost flu shot at your local community clinic or public health department.
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women-working-at-a-pharmacy-wearing-facemask
COVID-19 and Flu
Don't miss out on what's important, get the flu shot this season to protect yourself and your loved ones.
You might have questions about getting both a flu shot and a COVID-19 vaccine. We have the latest information to answer your questions.
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What is the difference between flu and COVID-19?
Flu and COVID-19 are both infectious respiratory illnesses, but are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a coronavirus (called SARS-CoV-2) and flu is caused by infection with an influenza virus.
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Can you get a flu vaccine after getting a COVID-19 vaccine?
Yes, there is no required time interval in between the two vaccines. You can get a flu shot after getting a COVID-19 vaccine or you can get a COVID-19 vaccine and then get a flu shot. You can even get both vaccines at the same time if it’s the right time to get them both.
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I got a COVID-19 vaccine, do I need a flu vaccine?
Flu vaccines do not protect against COVID-19. Flu vaccination reduces the risk of flu illness, hospitalization and death in addition to other important benefits. Likewise, getting a COVID-19 vaccine is the best protection against COVID-19, but those vaccines do not protect against flu.
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What should I know about COVID-19 vaccines and flu vaccines?
CDC expects flu and COVID-19 to spread this fall and winter so it's important this year to get a flu shot and get fully vaccinated against COVID-19. You can get both vaccines at the same time if it’s the right time to get them both. They are your best protection against these two illnesses.
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Does a flu vaccination increase your risk of getting COVID-19?
No, there is no evidence that getting a flu shot increases your risk of getting COVID-19.
Flu vaccines can prevent millions of people from getting flu. During the 2019-2020 flu season, flu vaccines prevented an estimated 8.7 million flu illnesses, 105,000 flu-related hospitalizations, and 6,300 flu-related deaths.
People who get flu are usually sick for about a week. Being protected against flu and staying healthy means you can be there for loved ones who depend on you.
two women high-fiving and smiling at each other bundled up outside in the snow
two women high-fiving and smiling at each other bundled up outside in the snow
People with certain chronic conditions are at higher risk of getting very sick from flu, including being hospitalized or even dying. Getting a flu vaccine can reduce the risk of giving flu to people with asthma, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, HIV/AIDS, and sickle cell anemia.
A flu vaccine helps protect the people around you who are more likely to get very sick from flu, like babies, young children, pregnant people, and older adults.
Get My Shot
There are many different flu vaccine options, including flu shots, a nasal spray vaccine, and special vaccines for people who are 65 years and older.
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emt-female-vaccinated-SM.jpg